True or False?

Velm

I'm just chinchillin'
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I was reading on another website that Standard grey Chinchillas are more hearty (health wise) and larger than any other color.

Is this true?
 

jags

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Michigan
In a lot of cases this is true but not all. I have some mutations that are just as big and have been around for a good many years, some almost 20 years.
 

Dreamlite

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Not true. I heard a rumor that blue diamonds are more likely to get fungus. Color has almost nothing to do with health.
 

becky12883

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If that picture is of Chewy, then she's a beige, not standard grey.

I don't have any standard greys, but I have 2 mosaics that are father and son, the dad is 800 grams and the son is 450 grams. I think chins are a lot like people, they come in all shapes and sizes.
 

Velm

I'm just chinchillin'
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If that picture is of Chewy, then she's a beige, not standard grey.

I don't have any standard greys, but I have 2 mosaics that are father and son, the dad is 800 grams and the son is 450 grams. I think chins are a lot like people, they come in all shapes and sizes.

Uh huh! Seems so! And we think they're adorable no matter how big or small they are, why can't we see humans the same way? tsk tsk tsk..
 

Sue

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Fungus is a product of husbandry and not the particular breed. I have never had fungus unless it has come in from other breeder's animals. We've dealt with it and don't have any issue going forward. By the way, we're breeding blue diamonds and have healthy, very special animals.
 
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akane

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Jan 8, 2013
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North Liberty, IA
Color does have to do with health because a lot of times when breeding for a recessive color other traits are put aside to preserve the color in the line. Recessives often have to be bred back to dominant colors to recover their health and other traits which in chins would be things like size and coat density. It happens with all animals. That's why I've always avoided the really light mutations in animals unless they've been around a long time. Aside from dominant whites they tend to be the recessives that have increased health problems.
 

Sarah Paes

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Jan 7, 2020
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[QUOTE = "sandycandy135, post: 350423, membro: 6175"]
Meu pequeno mastigável é um cinza padrão e ela é a menor dos meus 3 bebês.
Anexei uma foto dela olhando pensativa haha :)
[/CITAR]
Hm...... It's a beige mosaic
 

Sarah Paes

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Jan 7, 2020
Messages
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Oh the lady I bought her from told me she was a standard gray. Sorry for the misinformation
The color name doesn't make much difference after all, the only caution is that you can't cross a mosaic chinchilla with another chinchilla that carries the white gene. ;)
 

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