New female chinchilla

Carlo

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Joined
Apr 5, 2020
Messages
6
Hi everyone. I have a young male chinchilla about 7 and a half months old. I'd like to take a friend to keep him company. Now I would have the opportunity to take a three year old female who has already lived in a group. In my house I have room to keep two large cages close together and in the future I will sterilize my male. I have read, however, that it is a source of stress for the male to have a female close to him without being able to reach her. This is true? Or will it still be a company? Even if through bars
 

Amethyst

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It depends on the male, most seem fine with having a female in the room, they can get a bit annoyed when she goes into heat but that's about it. There are some though that can get so worked up they can't even be in the same room as females.

There are a few other things to keep in mind though. One is that there is no guarantee they will get along not all chins like other chins, so even if you got him neutered and tried to bond them the neutering could have all been for nothing. Also neutering is a risky operation, a lot can go wrong before, during, and after, if you don't have a very experienced vet that knows chins there is a high risk of complications and death. It's not like a normal neuter since the testicles are held mostly internal, so it's more like a retained testicles neuter when they need to cut into the lower belly. Recover is long too, a few weeks to heal externally, up to 8 weeks for all the sperm to get out of the system (making it safe to start trying to bond the chins) and up to 12 week to fully heal internally, assuming no complications.

Another thing to keep in mind is before neutering they can have no playtime together, mating literately takes a split second, hop on hop off the deed is done. The cages also need to be at least 6 inches apart or they can mate through the bars. So you can't really bond them before neutering your male to even see if they get along, other then see how they react with their cages being in the same room.

Lastly, it's advised to keep any new chins in quarantine in a separate room from your current chin for 30 days when you first get them. This allows any illness to show itself before exposing your current chin, for you to book a wellness check with the vet for the new chin, as well as for the new chin to settle in, and for you to start building a bond with it.
 

Carlo

Member
Joined
Apr 5, 2020
Messages
6
It depends on the male, most seem fine with having a female in the room, they can get a bit annoyed when she goes into heat but that's about it. There are some though that can get so worked up they can't even be in the same room as females.

There are a few other things to keep in mind though. One is that there is no guarantee they will get along not all chins like other chins, so even if you got him neutered and tried to bond them the neutering could have all been for nothing. Also neutering is a risky operation, a lot can go wrong before, during, and after, if you don't have a very experienced vet that knows chins there is a high risk of complications and death. It's not like a normal neuter since the testicles are held mostly internal, so it's more like a retained testicles neuter when they need to cut into the lower belly. Recover is long too, a few weeks to heal externally, up to 8 weeks for all the sperm to get out of the system (making it safe to start trying to bond the chins) and up to 12 week to fully heal internally, assuming no complications.

Another thing to keep in mind is before neutering they can have no playtime together, mating literately takes a split second, hop on hop off the deed is done. The cages also need to be at least 6 inches apart or they can mate through the bars. So you can't really bond them before neutering your male to even see if they get along, other then see how they react with their cages being in the same room.

Lastly, it's advised to keep any new chins in quarantine in a separate room from your current chin for 30 days when you first get them. This allows any illness to show itself before exposing your current chin, for you to book a wellness check with the vet for the new chin, as well as for the new chin to settle in, and for you to start building a bond with it.
Thanks for the reply. I know that castrating a male chinchilla is quite complicated. But the amateur breeder has recommended his veterinarian to me so I'm pretty calm about it. I also know that chinchillas may not get along and live forever in separate cages. So I wanted to know if a boy and a girl could be kept in the same room. In your experience, is it useful for a chinchilla to have another neighbor even in divided cages? Or is it useless?
 

Amethyst

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Thanks for the reply. I know that castrating a male chinchilla is quite complicated. But the amateur breeder has recommended his veterinarian to me so I'm pretty calm about it. I also know that chinchillas may not get along and live forever in separate cages. So I wanted to know if a boy and a girl could be kept in the same room. In your experience, is it useful for a chinchilla to have another neighbor even in divided cages? Or is it useless?
It can definitely be beneficial for chins to have other chins around, even if they don't get along or want to share a cage. It's like the difference between living alone far from other humans vs living alone but with a next door neighbor. They are social herd animals, so even having another chin to "chat" chinchilla to can help with their social needs and know they aren't the only chin in the world. I've also had chins that enjoyed having playmates during playtime, but didn't want to share their cage. I had I think 12 chins at one point, a mix of males and females and their cages were all in the same room.
 

Carlo

Member
Joined
Apr 5, 2020
Messages
6
[QUOTE = "Ametista, post: 391470, membro: 3770"]
Può sicuramente essere utile per i menti avere altri menti in giro, anche se non vanno d'accordo o vogliono condividere una gabbia. È come la differenza tra vivere da soli lontano dagli altri umani e vivere da soli ma con un vicino della porta accanto. Sono animali da branco sociale, quindi anche avere un altro mento con cui "chattare" i cincillà può aiutare con i loro bisogni sociali e sapere che non sono l'unico mento al mondo. Ho anche avuto dei menti a cui piaceva avere compagni di gioco durante la ricreazione, ma non volevo condividere la loro gabbia. Pensavo che 12 menti a un certo punto, un mix di maschi e femmine e le loro gabbie fossero tutti nella stessa stanza.
[/CITAZIONE]
Grazie ancora. Penso che aspetterò di trovare un cincillà maschio e se non va d'accordo con il mio li terrò nella stessa stanza ma li separerò comunque. Mi sembra l'idea più sicura per evitare qualsiasi problema
 

Sage12

Well-known member
Joined
May 19, 2020
Messages
48
I translated it to English through google translate. The first part is quoting Amethyst. It says, “thanks again. I think I will wait to find a male chinchilla and if it doesn’t get along with mine, I will keep them in the same room but I will separate them anyway. It seems to me the safest idea to avoid any problems.”
 

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