Help! It’s been two months and I still can’t touch my chinchilla.

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I really need advice from experienced owners. I got my chinchilla two months ago now and have made very little progress. He will eat treats from my hand and let me touch his nose but that’s about it. I’ve tried to take him out for playtime by trapping him in his dust bath and carrying him to his playpen but he is very skiddish and trapping him again to put him away is so difficult. And I certainly can’t pick him up because if I try I will have to chase him all over the place and he just gets more and more scared. I know in order to build a bond I have to take him out everyday but I can’t because I can’t get him in and out of the cage and playpen. I get so anxious I’m going to ruin what little progress I’ve made. I can’t even remove the tufts of fur that he sheds. I really don’t know what to do.
How do I get him to trust me to pet him?
I’ve been feeding him treats from my hand every day and I still can’t even touch him two months later. I’ve been researching as best as I can but at this point I need someone to just tell me what to do.
 

Amethyst

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Depending on where you got him it can take months or even years to get the point of tolerating handling. Some of the best things to do it just sit by the cage and talk to him open the cage and let him come to you and climb on your hands and arms. Let him come to you, you can't force or rush it you have to go at his pace. You also should not chase him during playtime, chins are pretty defenseless prey animals, so every time you are doing that you are proving to him you are not someone to be trusted. It's best to have a bonded formed before you do playtime so you aren't having to chase him, work on just getting him use to holding him for short times in and near the cage so he can go back in the cage if he feels scared. Obviously you can scoop him up and move him out of the cage if needed during weekly cleanings but it might work best if you can put him in a small cage or carrier so you can put him right back in the cage after.

Since you have been chasing and trapping him I would just look at it as you are starting from square one as though he is a brand new chin at this point, it can often take as long as it has happened to get over it, so if you have been chasing and trapping him daily for the past two months expect it to take at least that long to start trusting you. Go back to just giving him food, hay, and water and tidying up the cage everyday and doing the weekly (or however often) cage cleaning. It's best not to give treats everyday but you can rotate giving different things, a treat some days, a chew stick or toy another, hand feed pellets, a hay cube, pieces of a different kind of hay then you normally feed or a specific part of hay he likes (some chins think the seed heads are the greatest thing). Once he is coming to greet you when you enter the room and coming over for pets and climbing on you when you go to the cage then you can carry him over to the play pen. Again once you get to the play pen allow him to explore and come to you at his own pace, don't chase him if at all possible. If you really need to get him you can throw a blanket over him, that normally stops them long enough to allow you to scoop them up so you can put them back in the cage without any chasing or too much stress involved. I know a lot of people use the dust bath to try to lure the chins back, but frequently that just causes the chin to become wary of the dust bath, most are too smart to fall for that more then a couple times. You can even just start with a smaller area, like on your bed for example (put a blanket down first so you don't get poops all over the bed ;) ), so you have some control over where he goes and can't get too far from you.
 
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Ok thank you! I kept pushing playtime because all the stuff I read online said time out of the cage everyday was really important and I felt guilty not trying. I feel better knowing I’m not being a bad owner if I don’t take him out until he trusts me.
I will spend time just trying to get him used to me in his cage. Thank you again, I really needed some educated advice.
 

Amethyst

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Different people have different opinions on how much out of cage time is required, a lot of breeders say they don't need any at all 🙁. Chins are social creatures, but not really highly active, like say a dog, that require a lot of exercise everyday. So although I think playtime is important, I think that interacting with the chin, even if just in the cage, is a lot more important. Unless you chin is in a very tiny cage they likely get all the physical activity they need just inside the cage, if you don't already you can also get him a chin safe wheel (at least 14-16" diameter, solid metal) if you are worried he isn't getting enough exercise in the cage.
 
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Yeah I got him a chin spin but I’m not sure he uses it. I’ve never seen him on it, but maybe I’m just asleep when he uses it. Any tips on showing him how to use it?
 

Amethyst

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You can try sprinkling some dust on it, sometimes that can get them to step on the wheel and get the idea of how it moves. You can also try luring him with a tasty treat, get him to go on the wheel then hold it just in front of him so he walks forward. I would also just make sure the wheel spins properly, sometimes the bearings can go on those or get gummed up so they don't spin right or are hard to spin. Some chins just simply don't like wheels though, wheels are not important for chins to have like they are for other rodents but still sucks because they are so expensive. They do tend to use the wheel mostly at night, maybe try setting something on the wheel or mark on the wheel with a washable marker so you can maybe see if it moved overnight.
 
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